The Sample Copies of Yesteryear

sample copies

Let me tell you of the days of print magazines!

For those of you who don’t publish or aspire to publish your writing, part of the process often involves familiarizing yourself with magazines. Back in the print-only days, that meant ordering sample copies from a publisher, or subscribing, or (increasingly rarely as newsstands waned) going somewhere to purchase a copy in person. These days even print-only magazines often have samples of their fiction online, partly to lure would-be readers, partly to give writers an idea of what (not) to submit. This summer I was doing some cleaning and was reminded that over the years, I’ve amassed a small horde of sample copies. What you see here is a tiny fraction of it, as I have piles elsewhere of magazines I subscribed to or bought an issue or two of, including Cemetery Dance, F&SF, Grue, Deathrealm, Weird Tales, etc..

A pleasant surprise was seeing names that are familiar to me today from tables of contents, social media, conventions, and other parts of the publishing world: Allen, Cisco, Kilpatrick, Pugmire, Schwader, Schweitzer, Thomas, and many more. Some of those authors are still publishing in magazines, big and small. Some write full time, some part time. Some have had a lasting impact on readers and writers who came after them and, in some cases, followed their models.

tales of lovecraftian horror toc

A squamous menagerie…

I’d like to think the continued presence of these authors in the field says something about continuity, and about what makes a writer a writer (writing, yes, but publication, too). Once upon a time I bought into the idea of a standard template for authors’ literary lives, and up until a few years ago I was still thinking in those terms. The disruptions caused by publisher consolidation, e-books, etc., has changed that for me, but also taking a long, hard look at the market, and realizing that the Big 5 currently have only a sliver of a sliver of a niche for dark fiction, and it’s parceled out across the bookstores. (I’m skipping over YA and graphic novels, which are different kettles of fish, and neither of which I really write.) Instead, there are—as there were hundreds of years ago—various means for making your work public. The familiar names that I see belong to people who learned that lesson and published consistently wherever there was room, or who found a way to make room for themselves.

Less happily, the names I didn’t recognize in these magazines are as disproportionately female as those I do recognize are male. What happened to them? Hard to say, given how many writers publish a story or two and then vanish, and I don’t know every corner of the field, but many of the TOCs I saw do clearly uphold the idea of horror as a boys’ club (awareness of which has led to various attempts at correction), and there is a host of reasons why women historically have published less often than men. Personally I love the broadening of the field in recent years. Long ago I was reading Brite, Jackson, Rice, etc., and in the last decade authors like Carter, Kiernan, Link, Llewellyn, etc. The writer just starting out today who looks back in twenty years will have a new group of authors  to consider foundational, and I think it probably goes without saying, but that group will look different in more ways than one.

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About that List of Weird Fiction Publishers

A little over a month ago, I assembled and posted a list of weird fiction publishers. I shared it widely at the time, and in turn it’s been shared and reposted in a number of places, including Reddit. It’s gotten traffic most every day since then, and the overall number of visits here has risen to (for now) a steadily higher level than in past:

 

recent blog stats

 

My process for assembling the list was fairly straightforward. I reeled off a list by memory, took a quick-but-not-exhaustive look at my bookshelves, looked at websites of high-profile writers of weird fiction and link lists from high-profile publishers of weird fiction, and trawled social media. As such things inevitably do, all of that took longer than I’d planned. Originally I’d intended simply to do a list of names & links, but the speed with which the list grew, along with comments from a bunch of people, led me to organize it a little bit. Maybe not surprising for a librarian.

The list serves my original, stated purpose: a list for me and the world to use in order to find publishers of weird fiction. That said, lately I’ve been reading about the history of publishing, as well as literary sociology, and because I tend to overthink things, and because I’m having an especially ruminative year, I started pondering where this fits into the list of literary activities that are not creative writing: readings, social media, agenting, editing, reviewing, criticism, publishing, awards, conventions, conferences, affinity groups, etc. I don’t have any grand conclusions to articulate here, other than that I feel like the list is an attempt on my part to engage a little more fully with and contribute to the Weird-o-sphere.

And on the off chance you’re reading this and don’t know what weird fiction is? Here’s Stephen Graham Jones‘ Flowchart of the Weird [BoingBoing; Weird Fiction Review; flickr]:

weird fiction flowchart

Stephen Graham Jones’ Flowchart of the Weird

Writer’s Guidelines of Yore

obi-wan kenobi quote

Hey all you youngster writer-types, here’s an old chestnut from Grandpa Glover!

Eldritch Tales guidelines

Eldritch Tales guidelines

Prior to 1992 there was no World Wide Web, although the internet existed in its pre-GUI version. Back then, and actually for well into the ’90s in some cases, writer’s guidelines were not a click and a scroll away. You had to buy books like the Writer’s Market to figure out what a publisher wanted, or you had to get your hands on a publication and give it a gander yourself. (The latter is still a best practice.)

Both Writer’s Market and most magazines included a statement about sending a SASE for detailed guidelines. I tried with no success to get published back in those days, amassing hordes of rejections and writer’s guidelines in the process. Have writer’s guidelines changed in the years since? Definitely in some ways, but not in others. Yog knows, terms of publication have gotten more complicated, as have payment structures.

Here are two sample sets of guidelines from bygone magazines that long-ago me requested and stuck in a box that I was sorting through recently while doing some cleaning. They, along with my piles of sample copies from dozens of magazines, were a pleasant blast from the past.

Happy writing to you, and good luck with your submissions.

The Silver Web guidelines

The Silver Web guidelines

Writing Year 2014: Into the Blender

Around this time last year, I wrote a lengthy post about my writing activities in order to kick myself into higher gear. It worked. I didn’t meet every goal I set, but that doesn’t really bother me, for reasons detailed below. Writing a “year end” sort of post now, rather than at the end of the year, was a boost to my production last year, and we’ll see if it happens this go-round.

What’s new, pussycat?

This year’s writing theme, if you can say a year has a theme, has been “blending.” For many years I pursued creative writing largely apart from what I do as a librarian. One of my colleagues at VCU, Jenny Stout (review blog), started a discussion series within our division this year, “Research and Learning: Living Up to Our Name,” where people talk about aspects of their work, conceptual developments in the field, etc. She got the series off to a start with an hour of micro-talks, and I spoke about hunting for overlap in activities from different parts of your life, in order to increase efficiency, work strategically, etc. This has been productive for me, as I’ve found myself more dedicated to and interested in both scholarship and creative writing. I have no intention of blogging about my career as a librarian (God forbid; the internet is already littered with unread biblio-blogs), but selected contents & activities are another story.

Intersections

This week I submitted an article to a high-profile professional publication about work I did with a creative writing class at VCU. A submission is not an acceptance, but I’m a heck of a lot happier with that than with the idea lying in unquiet repose in my brain.

Next semester I am co-teaching with Tom De Haven a semester-long class about writing research-intensive fiction. This is aimed at students interested in developing both research skills and a proficiency at incorporating research into their fiction. Course description (ENGL 437).

Next March I’ll be delivering a paper at the International Conference for the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA 36). This paper will blend a lifelong literary interest and my more recent interest in digital humanities methodologies. Its title is “Node, Edge, or Tentacle? Data and the Lovecraftian Literary Network,” and it’s about a computational analysis of Selected Letters.

I have various future scholarly activities in the works associated with the above agenda(e). Just what form they take depends to some extent on how things go this spring, and realistically they aren’t going to be started until summer, but it’s good to have plans.

Into the field

This year I’ve read many good books, and some excellent ones. I’ve heard a number of people talking about a new golden age for the Weird, even a Weird Renaissance, and it’s hard to argue. From a score of anthologies, including the VanderMeers’ monumental The Weird, to continued excellence from Weird Fiction Review, to Mike Kelly’s establishment of Year’s Best Weird Fiction, things are coming up Weird all over. The kind of horror I like to read, which has a strong overlap with Weird, but not entirely, seems to have surged as well.

One of the best things I’ve read this year (am still reading, actually) is John B. Thompson’s Merchants of Culture: the Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century. Ross Lockhart, who has himself been having an impressive year, was talking about the book a couple months back, and so I picked it up. So glad I did. Merchants of Culture is an analysis of contemporary publishing in terms of Bourdieuian fields, among other things. I’ve spent a lot of time over the last decade trying to wrap my head around publishing and writing, and this book was part of what reshaped my thinking about authorship this year, from the role of scholarship in my creative life to the places where I aspire to publish.

I regularly attend the Annual Conference of the American Library Association, but this academic year I’m attending or have attended various other meetings. I was invited to attend/speak at Digital Humanities and the Dartmouth College Library, a one-day event in advance of The Digital Crucible, a conference focused on computation in the arts and humanities. Last month I attended the James River Writers Conference here in Richmond, where I moderated a panel entitled “Write What You Research.” Last weekend I attended the 40th World Fantasy Convention, where I met people across the range of activities in the fantastic arts (more on that another day). Next year I’m pleased to be guesting at RavenCon here in Richmond. The list of people I’ve met as a result of all of these activities is in the hundreds, so I’m not doing a roll call, but I will say that in the process I’ve made new friends, met heroes, and gotten a better understanding of the ecosystem of the writing world. I did (or am doing) all of this for a host of reasons, but Merchants of Culture led me to view my activities through a new and improved lens.

What have I accomplished in 2014?

Let’s go to the data…

statistics for fiction

Fiction Statistics, 2005-11/14/2014

Blog Statistics, 2005-11/14/2014

Blog Statistics, 2005-11/14/2014

Fiction & Blogging, 2005-11/14/2014

Fiction & Blogging, 2005-11/14/2014

I could talk about this in various ways, but I think the easiest thing to say is that I feel like I’m back on track. If I’d tracked things by month, and only shown the last two or three years, the difference would be even more stark.

Old goals

Write at least 100,000 words of completed or truly “in progress” fiction rough drafts by December 31, 2014.
Didn’t happen. The last day I added to my count, it was around 18,000. Since then I’ve written three stories, substantially revised several stories, and started and abandoned a novel.

Place six pieces of fiction for publication.
Placed three, which was actually my “good enough” goal, so I’m fine with that. I’ve got four stories out right now, one of which is a “hold for consideration,” so that’s good.

Get back to blogging.
Check.

Read at least two books per month.
Some months it was only one, but some months it was four, so… check.

2015 goals, you say?

Some of this is going to sound familiar, but…

  • Write at least 100,000 words of completed or truly “in progress” fiction
  • Complete enough thematically similar short fiction for a strong collection
  • Place six pieces of fiction and one essay for publication
  • Find a home for my Seattle magical realism novel
  • Draft two new scholarly articles or opinion pieces
  • Keep blogging
  • Read at least two books per month

I have a few other things on the stove, as well, some on front burners and some on the back, some small and some large. Further bulletins as events warrant.

And last but not least, thanks are more than due to my friend, partner, wife, and sine qua non, Kyla Tew. Without her support and patience, it would be difficult to do this.

Throwback Thursday, You Say?

In the mood for some Throwback Thursday action? Below are links to the top five posts I’ve written here…

On the Existence of the Female Tentacle” — 312 views — All about women who write Lovecraftian fiction.

Release the Leeches!” — 175 views — Release day and my writeup, lo those several months ago, for The Children of Old Leech.

Mary Chiaramonte / Land of Strangers / Eric Schindler Gallery” — 134 views — Review of Mary Chiaramonte’s 2012 show.

All the Colors of the Night” — 134 views — Review of Thomas Van Auken’s 2012 show at Eric Schindler Gallery.

Writing Year 2013: Statistics, Lies, Stagnation, and the Human Heart” — 115 views — An analysis with charts and statistics of my writing activities over a seven-year period.

Who’s Going to Be at the 2014 James River Writers Conference? (Part 5)

Who’s going to be at the 2014 James River Writers Conference? Bios are on the conference website, if you’d like to look at those. If you just want the names, try this on for size: Kwame Alexander, Cece Bell, Iris Bolling, Susann Cokal, Kaylee Davis, Arielle Eckstut, Tarfia Faizullah, Jane Friedman, Lamar Giles, Katie Grimm, Hugh Howey, Brian Jay Jones, Peter Knapp, Kristen Lippert-Martin, Sarah MacLean, Kelly O’Connor McNees, Meg Medina, Jody Rein, Sheri Reynolds, Jon Sealy, Geoff Shandler, Ron Smith, David Henry Sterry, Alison Weiss, Stacy Whitman.

Want to know a little more? Make with the clicking.

Geoff Shandler

Ron Smith

David Henry Sterry

Alison Weiss

Stacy Whitman

Want to learn about Kwame Alexander, Cece Bell, Iris Bolling, Susann Cokal, and Kaylee Davis? Check out Part 1 in this series.
Want to learn about Arielle Eckstut, Tarfia Faizullah, Jane Friedman, Lamar Giles, Katie Grimm? Check out Part 2 in this series.
Want to learn about Hugh Howey, Brian Jay Jones, Peter Knapp, Kristen Lippert-Martin, and Sarah MacLean? Check out Part 3 in this series.
Want to learn about Kelly O’Connor McNees, Meg Medina, Jody Rein, Sheri Reynolds, and Jon Sealy? Check out Part 4 in this series.

 

Come to the 2014 James River Writers Conference — register today!

James River Writers logo

Who’s Going to Be at the 2014 James River Writers Conference? (Part 4)

Who’s going to be at the 2014 James River Writers Conference? Bios are on the conference website, if you’d like to look at those. If you just want the names, try this on for size: Kwame Alexander, Cece Bell, Iris Bolling, Susann Cokal, Kaylee Davis, Arielle Eckstut, Tarfia Faizullah, Jane Friedman, Lamar Giles, Katie Grimm, Hugh Howey, Brian Jay Jones, Peter Knapp, Kristen Lippert-Martin, Sarah MacLean, Kelly O’Connor McNees, Meg Medina, Jody Rein, Sheri Reynolds, Jon Sealy, Geoff Shandler, Ron Smith, David Henry Sterry, Alison Weiss, Stacy Whitman.

Want to know a little more? Make with the clicking.

Kelly O’Connor McNees

Meg Medina

Jody Rein

Sheri Reynolds

Jon Sealy

PORTRAIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to learn about Kwame Alexander, Cece Bell, Iris Bolling, Susann Cokal, and Kaylee Davis? Check out Part 1 in this series.
Want to learn about Arielle Eckstut, Tarfia Faizullah, Jane Friedman, Lamar Giles, Katie Grimm? Check out Part 2 in this series.
Want to learn about Hugh Howey, Brian Jay Jones, Peter Knapp, Kristen Lippert-Martin, and Sarah MacLean? Check out Part 3 in this series.

 

Come to the 2014 James River Writers Conference — register today!

James River Writers logo